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Law School Oral Argument Tips

Law School Oral Argument Tips

Do you have oral arguments coming up in law school? Oral arguments can be intimidating to everyone – even those fairly comfortable with public speaking (and most of us aren’t!).

Below are some oral argument tips that might help you increase your law school oral argument grade (and your confidence!).  Continue reading Law School Oral Argument Tips

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Law School Flashcards: How to Use Flashcards the Right Way in Law School

Law School Flashcards: How to Use Flashcards the Right Way in Law School

Some students love flashcards. They used them in college and undergrad, and want to find a way to incorporate them into law school (or bar exam) studying.  Flashcards can be a great way to memorize the details of the law. They can also help you “actively learn” the law (you can learn a lot more from making flashcards than you can from simply rereading class notes or cases!) However, there are two significant downsides to using flashcards when studying for law school. There are also ways to overcome those downsides. We will explain both. Continue reading Law School Flashcards: How to Use Flashcards the Right Way in Law School

What Should I Do Over my Law School Study Period?

IMG_3150What Should I do over my Law School Study Period?

If you are overwhelmed thinking about your law school study period, you are not alone! Many students ask us what they should be doing to make the most of their law school study period.

We have plenty of tips – but we will start by giving you two simple  guidelines to help structure your law school study period: First, figure out your weekly schedule; and second, figure out your daily schedule.  Continue reading What Should I Do Over my Law School Study Period?

How to Write a Law School Outline Using Diagrams

diagram contracts outline how to write a law school outlineAre you a visual person? Do you prefer colors, pictures, and diagrams over black-and-white words? It might be worth it to try incorporating some diagrams into your law school outlines.

For example, contract formation can be broken down using words. This can help you memorize the elements of contract formation and become familiar with the words. However, you can put the same exact outline into picture format, as is pictured to the left.

Even if you are not a “visual” person, sometimes it helps to break things up and use a visual method to memorize a concept. This can be especially helpful with trickier concepts, for example, UCC 2-207. Most students struggle with UCC 2-207 quite a bit. If you put it into a picture format (as pictured below) it can really help you memorize it. Continue reading How to Write a Law School Outline Using Diagrams

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What Should I Do Over My Law School Thanksgiving Break?

What Should I Do Over My Law School Thanksgiving Break?  

Thanksgiving break is a nice time to study for your law school classes but it may also be a very busy time. You may either be traveling or you may have relatives or friends coming into town who expect you to spend time with them. You also probably certainly crave a break since (most of you have your legal writing memos turned in!) and you finally have a second to breathe!

The temptation to take time off is usually countered with a feeling that you should be studying, outlining, or practicing exam questions. Indeed, most law students feel a very real tension between relaxing/spending time with family and outlining or studying for their law school final exams. Family and friends who are not in law school can make this worse since they will wonder why you are not partaking in every activity. Continue reading What Should I Do Over My Law School Thanksgiving Break?

1L Final Exam Tip: Print some Law School Exams with Model Answers This Weekend!

Should I go to law school if I do not want to practice law?With all of the other assignments you have, the last thing you probably feel like doing is answering mock final exam questions. It is just another thing to add to your to-do list.

Not only is it more work but it is scary to see what a law school final exam actually looks like.  So many students never look at exams because they are afraid. They don’t know what is awaiting them so they purposely bury themselves in case-reading, case-briefing, and outlining and never pick up an exam.  This is unfortunate because many of these students do work very hard – they are simply inefficient.

The first step to getting over this is to get your resources together and print a bunch of practice exams so you can have them at your disposal. If you have a pile of practice exams sitting on your desk, it will be easier for you to make it a habit to regularly look at law school final exams. It will also be less intimidating because they are sitting right there! (On the contrary, if you don’t have any exams readily-available, you are even less likely to practice answering one for not only is it more work, and kind of scary, but it is also a hassle to search for every time you build up the courage to try one!) Continue reading 1L Final Exam Tip: Print some Law School Exams with Model Answers This Weekend!

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Where can I find law school outlines?

Where can I find law school outlines?

 The best way to prepare for law school final exams is to learn the law, then figure out how to apply it.

We are huge proponents of the idea that the best law school outlines you can acquire are the ones you write yourself. Outlining will help you internalize, organize, and become familiar with the concepts in a way that simply looking at someone else’s outline will not. Continue reading Where can I find law school outlines?

Sources for FREE MPRE Questions

free mpre questions, increase your MPRE scoreSources for FREE MPRE Questions

There are a plethora of sources for free MPRE questions. Many students get free MPRE questions as well as a free lecture if they sign up to take a commercial bar review course (such as our JD Advising course, or Barbri, Kaplan, Themis, etc.). However, if you have not yet committed to a course or if you are simply looking for more resources, feel free to explore the ones below.

Besides the first resource (which we highly recommend) we do not vouch for the effectiveness of the other resources, besides ours. Some may be good; some may not be so good! We just tried to compile a list of all of the free ones we could find! We recommend you try a variety of questions to prepare yourself for the MPRE exam. Continue reading Sources for FREE MPRE Questions

I Feel Lost in Law School. What Should I Do?

Should I go to law school if I do not want to practice law?So many students describe feeling lost in law school. They don’t like the Socratic-method-y learning style. They don’t feel comfortable with questions without answers. They aren’t used to the new legal language that they slog through in old cases. Nor the constant feeling of too-much-to-do-and-not-enough-time.  Many students feel as though they are on a high-speed treadmill – working really hard but not getting anywhere.

So if you are feeling lost in law school you should know that you are definitely not alone! Here are some tips that have helped our law students feel more oriented and in control of their classes:  Continue reading I Feel Lost in Law School. What Should I Do?

Five Backpack Carrying Tips for Law Students

backpack carrying tips

Picture by the sacred bridge in Nikko, Japan.

I used to carry a huge backpack in law school. I carried all of my books, a bulky laptop computer, as well as snacks and supplies − all on my back − all day, every day. I did it in college too. And I still do it. Every time I travel, I carry a heavy backpack with me. In fact, even for the last week, I have been wandering around Italy (and now Santorini), carrying a lot of my clothes and books on my back. This inspired me to find some backpack carrying tips for law students and others like me, who carry everything on their back. Continue reading Five Backpack Carrying Tips for Law Students

Alright, my law student friends, time to stop briefing cases! (And start outlining…)

Should I go to law school if I do not want to practice law?Fact: I forgot how to brief cases. I have to re-learn how to brief cases every time I teach law students or pre-law students how to brief cases. Why did I forget? Because I hardly ever briefed cases in law school!

However, briefing cases is not a bad skill to have . . . 

Briefing cases can be helpful, especially in the beginning of the semester. Briefing cases helps you become detail-oriented and it is helpful for dissecting somewhat-complicated fact patterns. It helps you to remain focused when you read. Perhaps it makes you less nervous if you’re called on. Briefing cases also helps you get comfortable with legal language if you regularly put the facts and law into your own words when writing your case briefs.

But there are two major downsides of briefing cases:

Continue reading Alright, my law student friends, time to stop briefing cases! (And start outlining…)

Topic 8: Become Familiar with the Key Words and Phrases on the MPRE

key words and phrases on the mpreTopic 8: Become Familiar with the Key Words and Phrases on the MPRE

Some students answer several MPRE questions incorrectly simply because they are not familiar with how the question is asked. Learning exactly what a question is asking is a critical first step if you want to maximize your MPRE score. Here, we tell you the key words and phrases you should be familiar with on the MPRE. We also tell you how to become familiar with them.

Continue reading Topic 8: Become Familiar with the Key Words and Phrases on the MPRE

National Suicide Prevention Week – for Law Students and Lawyers

Mee one sheetsSeptember 7-13, 2015 is National Suicide Prevention Week.  Given the high rate of depression among law students and lawyers, we felt compelled to write a post increasing awareness about suicide and depression.

Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States and the second leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 15 and 34. Last year, CNN reported that the proportion of lawyers that were committing suicide was much higher than in the past. In fact, lawyers rank fourth (behind dentists, pharmacists, and physicians – in that order) in the highest per capita suicide rate. CNN also reports that lawyers are 3.6 times more likely to suffer from depression than non-lawyers.  Continue reading National Suicide Prevention Week – for Law Students and Lawyers