Law School Final Exam Week Study Routine

If you are looking for tips for your law school final exam week study routine, look no further! These are the tips that our students use to get stellar grades in law school. These tips help you focus on what truly matters (getting good grades on your law school finals!) and omitting everything else that will not help you accomplish that goal.

Before You Start

Ideally, there are three things you should do before you begin your law school final exam week study routine:

  • First, finish your outlines! (for some of you, this will mean starting and finishing them! See below if this is you!)
  • Print practice exams — starting with your professor’s past exams, if any, and then moving on to online sources!
  • Make study calendar (see below)

What if you have not even started your outlines?

Believe me, you are not alone!

If this describes you, you have two options:

  • Option #1: Only focus on your class notes and condense them into outlines. (In other words, ignore your casebook, supplements, etc.!) This is preferable, assuming you have time to do this! Focus heavily on the black letter law. Omit cases, examples, etc.
  • Option #2: Get an outline from a friend, classmate, or Outline Depot. This should be an outline tailored to your class from your same professor. Ideally, it will be an outline that is easy to review and well-organized.

Study Calendar

A law school final exam study calendar may look something like this. Notice that you will probably focus on one or two classes per day. The day before a law school final you should ideally only focus on that class. It will be hard to focus on others.

Law School Finals Study Schedule

Law School Exam Study Routine

During study period, you want to focus on two things: learning your outlines and applying what you know to practice exams.

So, if you are studying for eight hours a day, assume you will focus on two classes (though as noted above, on some days, such as the day right before your final exam, you will probably realistically only study for that one).

For the first four hours do the following:

  • Spend two hours learning your outline (memorize the elements the best you can!). Do this even if you have an open book exam. You need to know the law! If you have an open book exam, you should also be organizing and tabbing your outline
  • Practice exams. This is so important. It truly makes the difference between an “A” and a “B” (or a “B” and a “C”). If you are intimidated by this, check out our guide on answering law school exam questions here.

Next, take a break. Ideally, you should eat something healthy and do some exercise (even a short walk around the block!)

Pour a cup of coffee and repeat the same routine above for the next four hours. This law school exam study routine will help you focus on the two things that will truly help you excel on final exams — learning the law and answering practice questions!

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